Forest Inventory and Analysis

December 11, 2019

From the 2019 Partners in Community Forestry Conference

The Partners in Community Forestry Conference is the largest international gathering of urban forestry practitioners, advocates, researchers, and government leaders. This year’s conference in Cleveland, Ohio, was another great gathering focused on urban and community forestry! Over 500 attendees joined forces for this annual event to partake in all things trees — from planting, care, [read more]

June 17, 2019

NASF Forest Health Committee meets in Hawaii

Hosted by Hawaii State Forester David Smith and the Hawaii Department of Forestry, members of the NASF Forest Science and Health (FS&H) Committee, staffed by Bob Simpson, held their Annual Partners and Stakeholders Meeting on the island of Hawaii in Waikoloa Village. This annual meeting consists of three segments: the FS&H Committee Business Meeting, the [read more]

September 20, 2016

NASF Releases 2016 Annual Report

The National Association of State Foresters (NASF) unveiled the 2015-16 NASF annual report today at its meeting in Savannah, Georgia. From city streets to remote mountainsides, trees connect a forested ecosystem that connects with people in countless ways. This is the essence of NASF's work, and the association is pleased to share recent accomplishments through this publication. Trees [read more]

May 26, 2016

House Committee Releases Draft FY17 Interior Appropriations Bill

By Greg Pilchak This Tuesday, May 24th, the House Appropriations Committee released the fiscal year 2017 Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill (see page 84). This draft legislation includes funding for the USDA Forest Service and various other independent and related agencies. The Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee marked up the bill on Wednesday, May 25th. [read more]

November 19, 2015

Patterns of Invasive Species: Clues to Stop the Spread

Scientists are still trying to understand what drives the relentless spread of invasive species in the United States. Invasions are often assessed by measuring species richness, or the number of non-native species known to grow in a certain area. However, other measurements of plant invasions could offer more insights. “We can make stronger inferences about invasions [read more]