Pests and Disease

May 6, 2021

You call a forest 'home,' whether you know it or not!

By Keith Wood If you live in a city or town, did you realize you actually live in a forest? It is estimated that 138 million acres of trees comprise the urban forests in cities and towns across the United States. These forests span many ownership boundaries and provide numerous environmental, economic, and social benefits [read more]

June 17, 2019

NASF Forest Health Committee meets in Hawaii

Hosted by Hawaii State Forester David Smith and the Hawaii Department of Forestry, members of the NASF Forest Science and Health (FS&H) Committee, staffed by Bob Simpson, held their Annual Partners and Stakeholders Meeting on the island of Hawaii in Waikoloa Village. This annual meeting consists of three segments: the FS&H Committee Business Meeting, the [read more]

March 5, 2019

Do right by your trees: Prune, and prune correctly

March is a great time to prune trees. While pruning can be done at any time during the year, new growth is maximized, wound closure is fastest, and pest risks are lowest if pruning takes place before spring growth. Correctly pruning a tree lengthens its life and increases its value, however poor pruning—especially "topping"—can lead [read more]

November 9, 2017

Hunters: Beware of EAB Tree Hazards

By Parker Jones According to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR), dead or dying ash trees are potential dangers to hunters. Falling from tree stands is the number one cause of serious injury in hunters. "Infested or dead ash trees are not as structurally strong as healthy trees, so they are not a good place to [read more]

December 19, 2016

Keeping Southern Forests Healthy and Strong

By Dr. David Coyle, Forest Health and Invasive Species Program at Southern Regional Extension Forestry Tree-munching insects, marauding fungi, and non-native plants are threatening the health of forests in the Southern United States.   To combat these menaces, accurate, up-to-date information on pest and invasive species management and control is key.   The Forest Health and [read more]