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Tuesday, February 24, 2015
For some animals, there’s no such thing as a dog-eat-dog world. They rule. Animals from around the world that stow away in airplanes, ships and the luggage of some smuggler become almost bulletproof when they make their way into the American wilderness as invasive species. Why? They’re new here, and they don’t have...
Tuesday, February 24, 2015
A Michigan State University scientist has developed a smart phone application to help keep track of invasive species. The free app is part of the Midwest Invasive Species Information Network developed by bio-geographer Amos Ziegler. It enables people who think they’ve spotted an invasive critter or plant to photograph it...
Tuesday, February 24, 2015
Hawaii's isolation has made the island state home to more invasive species than anywhere else in the U.S. Little fire ants, coconut rhinoceros beetles, albizia trees, rats, mongoose, strawberry guava, coqui frogs, miconia, fireweed and invasive algae all share one common trait.  As invasive species, they provide examples...
Wednesday, February 18, 2015
As regions of Kentucky continue to suffer from economic downturns, expanding timer commercialization may be one way to boost state and local economies, said Rep. Leslie Combs, D-Pikeville. Combs’ eastern Kentucky district is not the only portion of the state that could see an impact from an expanded timber industry in the...
Thursday, February 12, 2015
The Pulaski Award nomination process is open. The National Fire and Aviation Executive Board invites you to review the criteria and submit a nomination reflecting the accomplishments of our nation's finest. The Pulaski Award is an annual, national award for outstanding contributions to wildland firefighting from America's...
Wednesday, February 11, 2015
The National Association of State Foresters (NASF) State Foresters by the Numbers Report shows the key role state foresters have played in protecting non-federal forests and enhancing their value; providing technical assistance to nearly 200,000 forest landowners in 2012; and training more than 57,000 firefighters to...
Wednesday, February 11, 2015
Kansas windbreaks, also known as shelterbelts, offer a variety of benefits to Kansas farmers, says Bob Atchison of the Kansas Forest Service and recipient of NASF's 2014 Jim Sledge Current Achievement Award for Forest Resource Management. Windbreaks can help farmers increase crop yields up to 23 percent, improve calving...
Wednesday, February 11, 2015
Today more than 80 percent of the U.S. population lives in urban areas. It’s therefore fortunate we now understand many of the physical and psychological benefits healthy trees provide urbanites: Our parks and trees are more than aesthetically pleasing areas that help address pollution problems. Children are spending more...
Wednesday, February 11, 2015
National forest officials in Colorado and Wyoming said Monday that they plan to reopen more campgrounds and change tactics as a massive outbreak of mountain pine beetles wanes. Workers will now turn their attention more toward removing dead trees to prevent them from exacerbating wildfires, Medicine Bow-Routt National...
Monday, February 9, 2015
A new $13 million U.S. Department of Agriculture program designed to improve Kansas’ water quality, support wildlife habitat and enhance the environment was announced recently for Kansas State University and the Kansas Forest Service. The program is part of $370 million in federal funding for the new USDA Regional...

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