Wildfire

Submit a nomination for the 2018 Wildfire Mitigation Awards

The Wildfire Mitigation Awards Committee is pleased to invite nominations for the 2018 Wildfire Mitigation Awards.
 
Established in 2014, in response to an overwhelming number of great wildfire mitigation program efforts across the nation, the Wildfire Mitigation Awards are the highest national honor one can receive for outstanding work and significant program impact in wildfire preparedness and mitigation.
 

Ways to help Texas fire departments impacted by Hurricane Harvey

Officials from key fire service organizations of Texas are asking for monetary donations and equipment to help local Texas fire departments impacted by Hurricane Harvey.

Texas A&M Forest Service, State Firefighters’ and Fire Marshals’ Association, Texas Fire Chiefs Association, Texas Interstate Fire Mutual Aid System, and State Fire Marshal’s Office, officials deployed an online Rapid Fire Department Assessment Tool August 29 to determine any needs local fire departments had as a result of the storm.

NASF Annual Report

The NASF Annual Report highlights accomplishments by the nation's 59 State Foresters and their staffs to advance policy, communications, and operations priorities that help protect and enhance America's "green infrastructure": trees.

Wildfire Prevention Tips for this Month's Solar Eclipse

The full solar eclipse that will swoop across the United States on August 21 is exciting enough to draw up to 130 million people out to see the sun go dark. Unfortunately, this rush also poses a risk to our nation's wildlands.

There aren’t many cities located on the eclipses's optimal viewing path. While that's a boon to many of the smaller communities in those areas, it also means large crowds entering forests, grasslands, and deserts, such as those found in our nation’s national parks, to camp and otherwise get their eclipse fix.

Don't Fly a Drone Over A Wildfire

The National Interagency Fire Center says unauthorized drones have been detected over or near wildfires 17 times this year in nine western states. Of those incidents, 14 caused aerial firefighting operations to be grounded entirely. In 2016, unauthorized drones cropped up near wildfires more than 40 times, grounding air operations more than half the time.

“Any time an unauthorized drone is detected over or near a fire, it’s a serious situation,” said Jennifer Jones, a spokesperson for the U.S. Forest Service.

Thousands flee wildfires burning in the western U.S. and Canada

Wildfires barreled across the baking landscape of the western U.S. and Canada, destroying a smattering of homes, forcing thousands to flee and temporarily trapping children and counselors at a California campground.

Two major wildfires in California have sent nearly 8,000 people fleeing to safety.

About 4,000 people evacuated and another 7,400 were told to prepare to leave their homes as fire swept through grassy foothills in the Sierra Nevada, about 60 miles north of Sacramento, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said Sunday.

Florida Firefighters Help Battle Blazes in Western States

Forty-one wildland firefighters from the Florida Forest Service traveled this past weekend to assist wildfire suppression efforts in Western states.

“After battling more than 2,500 wildfires in Florida this year, Florida Forest Service firefighters are ready to help other states with their fires,” said Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam. “It is a priority for our department to help our partners defend life and property from the devastating effects of wildfire.”

2016 Communities at Risk Report

The Communities at Risk Report helps provide a national snapshot of wildland fire risk, preparedness and capacity in fiscal year 2016.

The data show progress to identify communities at risk of wildfire and those that are moving toward reducing risk, as well as increased capacity through the development of Community Wildfire Protection Plans and other methods.

Study: Wildfire pollution much worse than previously thought

Monstrous wildfires not only devastate communities and sometimes kill dozens each year in the U.S., but they also release a toxic brew of hazardous pollution, a new study found.​

That pollution, often in the form of microscopic specks known as aerosols, is "a hazard to human health, particularly to the lungs and heart," said study lead author Greg Huey from the Georgia Institute of Technology.