Urban and Community Forestry

Arbor Day Foundation Reforestation Request for Proposals

Since 2008, the Arbor Day Foundation has worked directly with the National Association of State Foresters to identify and support reforestation projects throughout the United States.  Through our partnership, and with support from Arbor Day Foundation members and advocates, we can provide funding for seedlings on large-scale restoration projects.  Since the beginning of this reforestation partnership, we have worked together to fund and plant more than 21 million trees.

NASF Releases 2016 Annual Report

The National Association of State Foresters (NASF) unveiled the 2015-16 NASF annual report today at its meeting in Savannah, Georgia.

From city streets to remote mountainsides, trees connect a forested ecosystem that connects with people in countless ways. This is the essence of NASF's work, and the association is pleased to share recent accomplishments through this publication.

State and Private Forestry Report Highlights Accomplishments and Emerging Trends in Forestry

Analysis of Forest Action Plan Five-Year Reviews Illustrates Impacts of Strong Partnerships and Effective Strategic Planning

WASHINGTON (September 7, 2016)—The National Association of State Foresters (NASF) has released the 2016 State and Private Forestry Report which includes success stories and an overview of emerging issues and trends that were recently identified by the state forestry agencies.

A Creative Solution in WI to Emerald Ash Borer

A new partnership between the city of Madison Parks Division and Wisconsin Urban Wood will allow residents to buy lumber or handcrafted products made from ash trees slated to be removed because of emerald ash borer (EAB), according to a release.

“The adaptive reuse of urban wood allows us to be sure that EAB won’t have the last word when it comes to our ash trees. We think Madison residents will share our appreciation for this silver lining to the lost ash and other park trees,” said Eric Knepp, parks superintendent.

Urban and community trees boost human health

Where would you rather be? In a city full of parks and tree-lined streets? Or in a city of concrete and glass?

Research scientist Omid Kardan and his colleagues at the University of Chicago studied the city of Toronto, which keeps health records for thousands of citizens, and a vast database of urban trees. Kardan’s study found that Toronto citizens who lived in green, leafy urban neighborhoods have lower rates of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, obesity and other health conditions.

NASF and MD Forest Service Lead Tour for Congressional Staff

By Greg Pilchak

On Wednesday August 10th, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Forest Service hosted an NASF State and Private Forestry program tour for key congressional staff.

Toronto: An urban forest in crisis

Toronto’s urban forest is in trouble. Climate change is set to have a major impact and planners must scramble to temper the fast growth of invasive species.

As the city tries to expand its canopy, mistakes from the past are showing why tree choice and smart planning matter for the coming years.

Cities are already a hostile place for trees to grow. The “heat island” effect creates a climate too warm for comfort, salt from the winter is damaging, the soil is suffering from nutrient degradation and root systems often go into shock.