Urban and Community Forestry

NASF Annual Report

The NASF Annual Report highlights accomplishments by the nation's 59 State Foresters and their staffs to advance policy, communications, and operations priorities that help protect and enhance America's "green infrastructure": trees.

The Value of West Virginia's Urban and Community Forests

West Virginia University (WVU) researchers and the West Virginia Division of Forestry have teamed up to better understand and communicate the significant economic and environmental impacts of urban and community tree canopy cover across the state.

Greg Dahle, associate professor of arboriculture and urban forestry in the WVU Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design, completed a report estimating that West Virginia urban forests provide annual ecosystem services of $59,749,507 by capturing 4,348,592 pounds of pollutants.

Trees Keep Cities Cool

Road surfaces, pavements and buildings all contribute to keeping urbanized environments hotter than surrounding non-urbanized areas. The urban heat island effect occurs around the clock as dense dark surfaces such as asphalt on roads and building materials accumulate and store heat during the day and then release it at night. One of the simplest solutions to reducing the urban heat island effect is to provide more shade with trees.

U.S. Capitol Grounds Now an Accredited Arboretum

The United States Capitol Grounds was recently named an accredited arboretum. The grounds are now listed in the Morton Register of Arboreta, a comprehensive list of arboreta and public gardens that have a substantial focus on woody plants for the benefit of the public, science and conservation.

As a Level II arboretum, Capitol Grounds is recognized as an area with at least 100 species of woody plants, dedicated staff, enhanced public education programs and a documented collections policy.  

Share Your Arbor Day Events

Arbor Day has always been one of those holidays loyally celebrated by some and yet completely unknown to others. It’s time to change that.

This year the National Association of State Foresters and the Arbor Day Foundation are asking you to submit information about your local Arbor Day celebration to be included on a cool interactive website that will raise awareness of the national holiday by showcasing a map of events across the United States encouraging residents to participate or just be “in the know.”

Invasive beetle threatens Tulsa's 200,000 ash trees

Since the emerald ash borer was first found in Oklahoma nearly three months ago in a trap near Grove, a few sightings from private land owners in that area—one verified—also have been reported.

The pest is of particular concern for Tulsa, given the city’s proximity to Delaware County and use of ash trees in streetscapes and parks.

The ash borer is a beetle not native to North America that attacks all types of ashes, with the potential to kill small trees in a year or two and large ones in three to four years.