Pests and Disease

Invasive beetle threatens Tulsa's 200,000 ash trees

Since the emerald ash borer was first found in Oklahoma nearly three months ago in a trap near Grove, a few sightings from private land owners in that area—one verified—also have been reported.

The pest is of particular concern for Tulsa, given the city’s proximity to Delaware County and use of ash trees in streetscapes and parks.

The ash borer is a beetle not native to North America that attacks all types of ashes, with the potential to kill small trees in a year or two and large ones in three to four years.

Presidential Transition Plan: Trees and Forests are America’s Natural Capital

Trees and forests built America and are essential for the nation’s growth and success. State forestry agencies are poised to support the new presidential administration. The National Association of State Foresters (NASF) is pleased to provide the Donald Trump Administration and Congress with recommendations for capitalizing on the benefits of trees and forests. 

Aerial Survey Identifies More Than 100 Million Dead Trees in California Alone

The USDA Forest Service recently identified an additional 36 million dead trees across California since its last aerial survey in May 2016. This brings the total number of dead trees since 2010 to over 102 million on 7.7 million acres of California’s drought stricken forests.

In 2016 alone, 62 million trees have died, representing more than a 100 percent increase in dead trees across the state from 2015. Millions of additional trees are weakened and expected to die in the coming months and years.

Plant Heroes Campaign Educates Youth about Forest Health Threats

By Emily Bazydlo 

Looking for a fun an innovative way to teach youth to identify plant pests and diseases in their communities?

Check out Plant Heroes, an educational campaign by the American Public Gardens Association with support from the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Serivce and Forest Service, offers free downloadable educational materials with fun characters that teach students about invasive species.

October is Firewood Awareness Month

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s (APHIS) Hungry Pests campaign has partnered with the Nature Conservancy’s Don’t Move Firewood campaign for the first-ever Firewood Awareness Month.

The goal of Firewood Awareness Month is to raise public awareness about firewood movement as a forest pest and disease pathway using our respective social media platforms for blog posts, messaging with sharable graphics and media releases.