Climate Change

Aerial Survey Identifies More Than 100 Million Dead Trees in California Alone

The USDA Forest Service recently identified an additional 36 million dead trees across California since its last aerial survey in May 2016. This brings the total number of dead trees since 2010 to over 102 million on 7.7 million acres of California’s drought stricken forests.

In 2016 alone, 62 million trees have died, representing more than a 100 percent increase in dead trees across the state from 2015. Millions of additional trees are weakened and expected to die in the coming months and years.

Everglades mangroves might hold billion-dollar fix for climate change

The price of fighting climate change in South Florida has so far focused largely on the billions needed to install pumps, raise roads and retrofit the sprawling infrastructure that keeps the region above sea level. But South Florida might already have a valuable weapon that for ages has been sucking up carbon and keeping the planet cool: mangrove wetlands in the Everglades.

To figure out just how valuable, scientists crunched some numbers to assign a price tag to Everglades National Park’s mangroves. It turned out way bigger than anyone thought.

State and Private Forestry Report Highlights Accomplishments and Emerging Trends in Forestry

Analysis of Forest Action Plan Five-Year Reviews Illustrates Impacts of Strong Partnerships and Effective Strategic Planning

WASHINGTON (September 7, 2016)—The National Association of State Foresters (NASF) has released the 2016 State and Private Forestry Report which includes success stories and an overview of emerging issues and trends that were recently identified by the state forestry agencies.

Wildfires Heat Up Across the West

Homes evacuated. Buildings destroyed. Thousands of acres scorched. The peak of the fire season is yet to come, and it’s only being made worse by climate change.

The wildfires blazing in California, Alaska and across the Southwest are threatening communities and natural resources. In Alaska, the first wildfire this season started in late February, yet the season typically begins in April or May. 

The Great Potential of Building With Wood

In North America, where the building sector accounts for about 37% of carbon dioxide emissions, building with wood represents an opportunity to mitigate climate change. Ultra-strong wood products, like cross-laminated timber, could be a boon to green building and forest markets. A recent study by a researchers from Yale and the University of Washington estimated that global carbon dioxide emissions could be reduced by 14%-31% if wood were used in the place of steel and concrete in construction.

California Street Trees Provide $1 Billion in Annual Value

A new report from the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Research Station estimates trees lining California’s streets provide benefits to urban communities worth $1 billion annually. Using i-Tree, an urban forest inventory and management software suite, researchers arrived at a complete understanding of California’s tree species, size, location, and associated benefits.

Tree Mortality Poses Wildfire Threat in Pacific Northwest

The impacts of the last three years of drought are finally manifesting themselves throughout the Pacific Northwest. Douglas firs have been affected the most, dying off and peppering the landscape with burnt-orange needles. The die-offs come despite a rather wet winter, as recent drought and associated beetle infestations stressed the trees. In certain areas, cold, dry east winds from last winter froze the foliage of many coniferous trees, leaving trees green on one side and orange on the other.